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interesting, but i have spent over a year in being a spokesperson for the pakistan people's party as well as in government as a minister. i resigned about a while ago. it is not difficult for me to be boring for an hour and not give you something. my intent is to just give you a very quick, i am told, three- minute rundown of where we are in the pakistan-u.s. relationship. i assume that is of interest to everyone here. i'm happy to take questions about other issues or concerns that you might raise. it is good to be able to say that after a year, nearly over a year of my being here in washington since november, 2012, this relationship has come a long way since the days of early 2011 and early 2012 when it was marked by chronic mistrust and times of mismanagement and episodes that left many of us awake at night. i'm happy to report that the relationship is now on a stable and, we hope, up hill trajectory. our expectations are clearly articulated to each other. and certainly, the goals that we have mutually in the region and working for peace and stability in south and central asia as well a
by extremist who operate in the border area between afghanistan and pakistan. this is about an hour and a half. ♪ good morning. good afternoon, everybody. welcome. i'm steve cool i'm the president of new america foundation. it's my pleasure to welcome do you to the event briefly and introduce our subject, which from our perspective involves the launch of the book that somebody will hold up for the audience. since i don't have a copy. "talibanistan." i just wanted to say a few words about where this book came from and why the subject matter. you'll hear discussed today struck us as worthy of what became really a couple of years of endeavor at new america lead by peter bergen who will be the host and moderator through most of the program today. peter and katherine who is not here with us today. coed ditted this book from the oxford university press. it's a collection of scholarly and journalistic articles about the taliban and the environment in southern afghanistan and western pakistan. , and it born as an attempt at new america by a diverse group of researchers to get at some of the diversit
key talks on the afghan peace process involving the leaders of pakistan and afghanistan at his country retreat north of london. the talks are focusing on cross border security and how to engage the table ineffective peace talks. the bbc's david looks at what all the leaders hope to gain from the summit. >> all three of these leaders have a stake in improving stability between afghanistan and pakistan. president karzai has long believed pakistan has been blocking their attempts at peace. afghanistan wants more including the former table leader. and david cameron wants stability as the british troops come home although president karzai announced a sour note saying they were leaving because perhaps they realized they had been fighting in the wrong place and that the province was more peaceful before the invasion and pakistan increasingly believe the table are a threat to their stability until recently they saw the table as clients who would serve their interests. fighting in the border region has cost thousands of pakistani lives and the girl shot while going to school brought many togeth
would take pakistan as a case study and walk us through the different tribes and the situation in your home country. >> guest: pakistan is a central piece of the study. why? because the tribal areas is one of the most targeted places on earth for the drone program waziristan is one of the most highly tribal societies on the face of the earth and it's traditionally never been completely conquered or subdued or incorporated into any government. it is part of pakistan, and yet it maintains -- the tribes maintain their own independence and great pride in their open culture and old traditions. now, what they're finding -- i'm talking about the ordinary tribes and not these bad guys -- what the ordinary tribes have found -- think about it. put yourself in the shoes of the tribe and like atticus finch in to kill a mocking bird. get under their sking. one day being blown up by helicopter and artillery, next day by the crazy suicide bombers. the third day by tribal rivals. the fourth day by drone strikes, and in complete desperation he sends somebody out to waziristan , huge chunks living in ci
make her contribution to our nation. >> pakistan's ambassador to the u.s., sherry rehman, text about drug strikes and international law. she discussed u.s. pakistani relations during this event hosted by the christian science monitor. it's an hour. patio mark >> our guest is sherry rehman, pakistan's ambassador to the united states. this is our first visit and were grateful she agreed to be here since the last ambassador who visit has lost his job the next day. [laughter] so you now, you're a woman at danger. i guess is the daughter of a prominent parents and the phi beta kappa to graduate where she said and history. she spent 20 years as a journalist in print and broadcasting of us to become editor of the herald news magazine. in the political world, she was first elected to parliament in 2002 to send her current in washington. she sat down as ranking member that national security committee in pakistan's parliament and is chairperson of pakistan's red crescent society. so much for biography, not too exciting matters of process. as always, we are on the record. no live blogging or tw
. >> host: take pakistan and walked us through the different tribes. >> it is the essential piece of the study because waziristan is one of the most targeted places on earth. one of them most high and the tribal places an onerous never completely conquered it is part of pakistan but they maintain their own dependence with pride and tradition. the ordinary tribes have sound pledge yourself in the tribeca it in their skin and walkabout one day thrown about by helicopters and up to hillary than suicide bombers than travels in the fourth day by a drone strikes and incomplete desperation huge chunks of was there is stand live in the just to refugee and every day is like 9/11. go back to the man in the village would never the debate of drones there is a dimension often missing with the impact is devastating and has been documented by stanford and new york univ. >> host: you mentioned drones in your book talks about the drone situation in washington. what is the view of drones? >> you use the word debate it is just beginning but the debate has to opposing points of view in america you on
that same question in afghanistan or pakistan or africa 90% of ands come up and i think the as great tragedy we've lost that oral tradition and a rich tradition about folklore and heritage and faith and heritage. to honor that today i'd like to share with you a little story. it's a hard cover book that came out in march of 2006. anybody have a hard cover. wave it up here. you might not want it after i say this. i got to pick the title. three cups of tea but viking told me they would pick the subtitle and they picked one man mission to fight terrorism one school at a time. i objected because obviously there's- ways to fight tear riz m with education but i said i do this to promote peace and i started 8 years before 911 and this is about promoting peace through education. i've worked afghanistan and pakistan many years and i said we need to have a tribal council. i went to manhattan in the fall of 2005 and the big boss of the whole group, nancy shepherd and carlin coburn in publicity. we met in a little room and i stated my case and they said, this is your first book so you need to listen to a
>> protests across pakistan as the number killed in the bombing rises to more than 80. demanded better protection and the interior minister tells us the government is doing everything it can. hello. you're watching al-jazeera live from london. also coming up -- >> gunmen have kidnapped seven foreign workers in the northern states of nigeria. >> cousin marking its sixth birthday as an independent state. we talk about the challenges they face -- kosovo marking its sixth birthday. catholicse blesses for the first time since announcing his resignation. >> hello and thank you for joining us. the $1 million reward offered for the capture of a group carrying out a deadly attack in pakistan. more than 80 people killed in an explosion in a busy area. shias there, and those across pakistan, are demanding the government do more to stop the attacks. >> a strong message. stop the killing of shias. this is in response to saturday's bombing targeted a shia bazaar. they're giving them 48 hours to arrest the culprits before they take action. >> we want to register our protests. we demanded to no
returned the body of the pakistan soldier. the indian army says he was shot during a gunbattle with its troops on indian soil. the pakistan military says this soldier at still be crossed the line of control. -- accidentally crossed the line of control. at least four people have died during more unrest in bangladesh over war crimes tribunal. supporters of the islamic party clashed with police. they say a life sentence given to one of their leaders was politically motivated. they have been -- there have been larger demonstrations in support of the trial. >> the seaside town, the scene of the latest confrontation between police and supporters of the largest islamic party. several people were killed after it -- officers said they opened fire on the protesters after they were shot at. they do appear to show that the crisis surrounding the controversial war crimes tribunal is far from over. these people say all life term handed out on february 5 was too harsh. the charges are politically motivated. in the capital, and other big protest was held to declare the sentence was too lenient. these b
. >>> chinese officials have tak over management of a port in pakistan. officials from a chinese state run firm acquired the rights last month to control gwadar port in south western pakistan. it lies near the strait of hormuz. pakistani president and chinese ambassador attended a hand over ceremony in the capital. the port is strategic for chichn it imports crude oil from the north. >> it gives importance to china-pakistan relations. >> the chinese ambassador says much of china remains unstable. they must take advantage when they see openings. >> to seize opportunities. >> chise companies were recent involved in a series of port projects in myanmar. the entrance into pakistan has raised concerns in india. >>> people in many parts of china say the clouds of smog they have seen for weeks make it harder to breathe. scientists say particles in the air could damage people's health. researchers studied samples from the atmosphere over beijing and two other areas. they detected a harmful compound when exposed to sunlight. chinese people have just come back from celebrating the lunar new year. their c
. this is pakistan in 2005. 74,000 people were killed in this earthquake. 18,000 were kids going to school. most of the kids that died were younger and female because they didn't have desks so when the walls started shaking and the roof came down they perished. there was 9,000 schools destroyed or rendered unusable. 1/2 million kids displaced out of school. in earthquake, they call it the coy mot that means this apocalypse. at first there was a very heroic effort. infer natio international community helped. after katrina red cross got 2,000,000 for help and for this earthquake red cross received 6 million dollars. the united states sent in helicopters that conductd the greatest air lift in the history of mankind. moved about 20 thousand on thes in the mountains to keep 1/2 million people a hive during the wintertime. it was very heroic and people were grateful. aid has dropped 70 percent after a year in the wake of that void many jihad and people labeled terrorists have set up camps. this is one here. in pakistan. and in that camp, there are many kids that are previously were going to school and
continues to recover, today the taliban are the focus of talks in london between the leaders of pakistan and afghanistan. the goal is to create a more stable environment for when nato forces leave afghanistan in 2014. the mission is to get the taliban to negotiate peace, but what are the chances? >> 12 years into a war that has cost 440 british lives, the prime minister invited the leaders of both afghanistan and pakistan to talk about the threats facing them all. >> the united kingdom will continue to stand firmly behind both countries as they work together to bring peace and stability to the region. finally, the progress we have achieved today sends a very clear message to the taliban. now is the time for everyone to participate in a peaceful political process in afghanistan. >> as british troops prepared to withdraw from afghanistan and handoff to afghan forces, intense combat like this is rare now. the military believe they have done their job and that this insurgency, like all others, needs a political solution. >> the clock is ticking. we have until the end of 2014, maybe not as lo
for renewable energy know-how and technology from partners such as japan. nhk world, thailand. >>> pakistan's auto market has long been dominated by companies from japan. the strong brand image and established sales networks have kept rivals firmly in the rear-view mirror. but now an ambitious newcomer is starting to close the gap. we report from islamabad. >> reporter: on the chaotic streets of pakistan one thing has been constant -- old or new, most vehicles here are japanese brands. pakistani loves japanese cars. so much so that nearly 100% of automobiles traded in the domestic market are japanese. some vehicles are even decorated with the names of japanese companies. most drivers don't read japanese. but that's not the point. the decorations look cool. >> translator: you can show off your car is a japanese car. and it looks cool with stickers on. >> reporter: but domination of japanese brands is under threat. this model show took place in the southern city of karachi last month. most exhibitors were the familiar names from japan. but this year, for the first time, they shared the space
from partners such as japan. khemmapat rog juan chic uh in thailand. >>> pakistan's auto market has long been dom nauted by companies from japan. established sales networks have kept rivals firmly in the rearview mirror. but now an ambitious newcomer is starting to close the gap. nhk world reports from islamabad. >> reporter: on the streets of pakistan, one thing has been constant. old or new, most vehicles here are japanese brands. pakistanis love japanese cars. so much so that nearly 100% of automobiles traded in the domestic market are japanese. some vehicles are even decorated with the names of japanese companies. most drivers don't read japanese. but that's not the point. the decorations look cool. >> translator: you can show off your car as a japanese car. and it looks cool with stickers on. >> reporter: but the domination of japanese brands is under threat. this motor show took place in the southern city of karachi last month. most exhibitors were the familiar names from japan. but this year for the first time they shared the space with rivals from china. china's leading auto
tilted towards pakistan. what is your sense of the importance if any of kerry's? >> pair of vital importance to both countries and we appreciate very much the fact state department has been one of our best interlocutors through difficult times and we hope as we look towards better spaces, we craft policy together. senator kerry's very respected. he brings experience for both the region and policy. while i have decided to take this opportunity to also appreciate the outgoing secretary of state, the inimitable mrs. clinton has been an ally and partner uncertainly viewed very well in pakistan as the most important and powerful diplomat representing the united states views abroad. we welcome john kerry because pakistan has john kerry as the architect -- one of the architects of the kerry lugar berman legislation, which has been instrumental in broad basing this relationship and anchoring it and we hope they longer and more sustainable multifaceted relationship. we also know it's not a relation as well as political parties. we work and we hope to work with every senior policymaker in t
sits down with me only a few weeks before returning back to pakistan where he's now a wanted man. many hot dogs are within you. try pepto-bismol to-go, it's the power of pepto, but it fits in your pocket. now tell the world daniel... of pepto-bismol to-go. >>> i had a feeling of dread when i recently sat down with former pakistani president pervez musharraf here in washington. the conversation was eerily similar to one i had with former pakistani prime minister benazir buddo five years ago shortly before she was assassinated. the former pakistani president, once a close ally of the united states, now is a wanted man in his homeland. but he tells me he's ready to risk imprisonment and even his life to return to the country he fled nearly four years ago. are you going back to pakistan? >> i am. >> why? >> because i think pakistan needs me. because i think one can contribute to stabilizing the problems in pakistan. >> reporter: musharraf became president in june 2001 just before 9/11. he allied himself with president george w. bush in the war against terror. but the support of the u.s. co
highlighted pakistan's deep sectarian tension. at least 60 have been killed in an explosion in the southwestern city of quetta. more than 200 were injured when a bomb exploded outside a market. police say it was aimed at the region's minority shia population. attacks in quetta have killed more than 200 in the past month. we have the latest from islamabad. what more do we know about this attack? >> hi, barbara. what we know is that this bomb, which went off in this market was very powerful bomb. it was an improvised explosive device and more than 60 people were killed and well over 200 people were injured. this attack, of course, comes only five weeks after another major attack, pakistan's worst ever sectarian attack in which close to 100 people were also killed in a similar bombing. the people targeted in that attack and this attack are the same. they are ethnic minorities from the hazara tribe. they are shia minorities, as well, and yet again, they've been attacked in their community in quetta. now, the
. >> that was nhk world's yohicharo osaki. >>> pakistan is facing an energy shortage and is partnering with iran in the hopes of finding a solution. patchari raksawong at our bureau in bangkok is following the story. >>> pakistan is cooperating with iran to import natural gas from the country. the pakistani government again pledged commitment to the project on thursday. but the announcement raises questions of the plant's impact on relations with the u.s. nhk world reports from islamabad. >> reporter: the pakistani government plans to build a pipeline in iran. construction is already under way on the iranian side of the border. the united states strongly opposes the project, saying it would benefit iran. the u.s. has denounced iran's nuclear development program. washington has urged islamabad to scrap the plan. a spokesperson for the pakistani foreign ministry stresses the country's position to push the project forward. >> we know that americans have reservation. pakistan being enormously energy deficit country, it is in our national interest to have this project and we are committed to have thi
on their government to put an end to sectarian violence in the country. we have the details. >>> people in pakistan are speaking out against sectarian violence, following a bombing which killed 85 people. as anti-shiite violence surges, people are calling on government to take action. we have the report. >> reporter: thousands of people have staged protests in several cities in pakistan. they are demanding military action following the sectarian killings of shias. >> our request is that we want the army -- the army should come here and target operations should be started. >> reporter: the weekend bombing killed 85 people and wounded around 170 others near a market in quetta. home to many shias. a sunni militant group has claimed responsibility. they regard shiites as pagan. the same city was hit by another attack on january 10th which killed about 100 people. the same group claimed responsibility for this attack targeting shias. a local human rights group says more than 400 people were killed in sunni terrorist attacks last year, the highest number of fatalities on record. violence against shia mus
in pakistan. a key question is blowback, no one knows how many untargeted civilians have been killed by drone strikes or the damage to winning hearts and mind over there. the effect of blowback is a central theme in the television series "homeland" where the main character goes from captured marine to terrorist himself when the son of his kaptur in iraq is killed by a thrown. they watch the american vice president on tv together after that drone strike. >> the images being broadcast on some outlets around the world are the bodies of 83 dead children, allegedly killed in the strike. we believe to be false. created by the terrorists for propaganda purposes. >> and they call us terrorists. chris: they call us terrorists there. david, there's the question, i guess, maybe not the most important question but we're all asking right now. collateral damage. people killed in these drone strikes who are innocent and how much that causes hatred to this country. >> everyone who really follows the drone program carefully says that the level of collateral damage is smaller than with any corresponding weapon
for many years to come. >> that was nhk world's youchiro osaki. >>> pakistan is facing an energy shortage and partnering with iran in hoping of finding a solution. we're following the story from bangkok. >>> pakistan is cooperating with iran to import natural gas from the country. the pakistani government again pledged commitment to the project on thursday. but the announcement raises questions of the plant's impact on relations with the u.s. nhk world reports from islamabad. >> reporter: the pakistani government plans to build a pipeline in iran. construction is already under way on the iranian side of the border. the united states strongly opposes the project, saying it would benefit iran. the u.s. has denounced iran's nuclear development program. washington has urged islamabad to scrap the plan. a spokesperson for the pakistani foreign ministry stresses the country's position to push the project forward. >> we know that americans have reservation. pakistan being enormously energy deficit country, it is in our national interest to have this project and we are committed to have this proj
. meanwhile on tuesday, pakistan's ambassador to the u.s. discussed the issue of drone attacks saying strikes are indirect violation of international law and her events came at an event hosted by the "christian science monitor." >> i want to ask you about the drones. pakistan's position is that the drone strikes are a violation of your sovreignty and international law and i think under both of those guidelines you have the right to self-defense. and further, just to guide your answer, has pakistan threatened to shoot down drones, and if not, why not? the reason i ask this is because there is an understanding that while pakistan publicly opposes the strike, privately it sort of winks. >> let me address this as most people do to speak to what they can in terms of the question put and it's an important question and you do ask -- you ask a question which many ask, is there a quiet come policity in this. let me assure you, there is no question of quiet come policity or wink and nod. this is a parliamentary red line all government institutions have internalized as policy. and you know, i say this a
is that it to afghanistan and pakistan. you understand this area of the world very closely. how important is this to the national security? >> it has killed a number of al qaeda leaders but it has not decimated the organization completely. it has pushed them to move into other areas of the middle east. also, at a very high political cost. it does cause an enormous amount of anger in pakistan which has helped to spread extremism. the pakistan is feel that this has encouraged attacks on civilians. >> the drone program has been stepped up a lot by the obama administration. now, we're starting to see questions in the u.s.. >> the problem is who are they targeting? the high-value targets, we know who they are. there are many more attacks that killed lower-level targets. people that might be mildly associated with terrorists. the larger issue is that it is causing a political problem. people in pakistan think whether these targets are legitimate or not, the u.s. is violating their airspace and national sovereignty. that my be a greater cost. >> those are not the arguments i was hearing listing
by territorial disputes with pakistan and china. china has become a rising concern in recent years. last september, china announced deployment of its first aircraft carrier. the country is also financing port facilities in pakistan, myanmar and sri lanka, effectively extending chinese influence throughout the indian ocean. last month, beijing received custodial rights over a harbor in pakistan. experts claim such moves force india to boost spending to keep pace with china, something hinted by the india's defense minister. port facilities in pakistan, hinted by the india's defense >> reporter: india's military strategy isn't limited to buying technology from overseas. last april, they successfully tested the long range ballistic missile capable of reaching most parts of asia. and just last month, it announced it developed an underwater ballistic missile. india has drawn interest for arms and aerospace industries around the world. abhishek dhulia, nhk world, new delhi. >>> people in japan have spent nearly two years documenting the aftermath of the erik and tsunami that change sod many liv
are still not allowed access to such services. >>> with have his story from pakistan. >> reporter: this tv commercial is widely popular in pakistan. it features this performer. it's the pakistan take on the british icon. the mr. bean corrector was created by comedn robert atkinson. he won enormous worldwide popularity in the 1990s. the tv comedy takes the director from the original british program and transplants him into situations in pakistan. >> translator: my kids love him. they're always watching. >> translator: we are bombarded every day with bad news. he helps us relax a bit. >> reporter: he is played by 35-year-old mohamad asif. when he was young his father die and he was forced to leave school. after leaving junior high he found work in his hometown. this one video clip turned around his life. one of his friends posted the footage online three years ago it became a wide hit in the country. a local tv station started to take notice. he gave up his day job as a cotton trader and made the risky transition to show business. he had only one thought in his mind. >> translator: i decided
pakistan's southwest a day after a bomb attack left more than 80 dead. >> i am alan fisher in washington, dc. what organizers call the biggest climate change protest ever seen in the united states. >> where is relief? the question asked in indonesia as prices reach a new high. angry protests in pakistan over a blast in a mainly shiite district after an attack by a pro-sunni group claimed more than 80 lives. shia muslims have given authorities 48 hours to arrest the culprits, and have refused to bury the victims. >> their message is clear -- stop the killing of shias. this protest in karachi is in response to saturday's bombing that attacked ethnic shias at a market, killing more than 80. on sunday, leaders issued three important demands to the government. first, to ensure no more shias are killed and ledges -- sectarian attacks, pass legislation that would would make dissemination i -- discrimination again she is a crime, and go after those that attacked the community. >> we want to register our protest. we demand the army and the judiciary take notice of the blast and other targeted ope
.s. considers pakistan a friend but has our government heard this one? 92% of pakistani disprove of u.s. leadership. by the way, who are the other 8%? also donald trump in the middle of a family feud. details coming up. for over 75 years people have saved money with...ohhh... ...with geico... ohhh...sorry! director's voice: here we go. from the top. and action for over 75 years people have saved money with gecko so.... director's voice: cut it! ...what...what did i say? gecko? i said gecko? aw... for over 75 year...(laughs. but still trying to keep it contained) director's voice: keep it together. i'm good. i'm good. for over 75...(uncontrollable laughter). what are you doing there? stop making me laugh. vo: geico. saving people money for over seventy-five years. gecko: don't look at me. don't look at me. [♪...] >> i've been training all year for the big race in chicago, but i can only afford one trip. and i just found out my best friend is getting married in l.a. there's no way i'm missing that. then i heard about hotwire and i realized i could actually afford both trips. see, when
relationship with pakistan and some other things. it is important for the region and it is important for the country of afghanistan and a portent for nato and the united states of america. >> i know my time is up. general rodriguez, i would like your answer on why this matters to our country. we have sacrificed so much there. why does the outcome of afghanistan matter? >> it is one of the things that was one of the objectives, that it never became a haven for al qaeda, so that we can protect the homeland and our interests worldwide. >> thank you. i will have follow-up questions for both of you. >> general, thank you for your service to the army into the nation. i cannot think of two more dedicated and experienced officers to leave our forces in the various areas of command you have been assigned. quebec -- correct me if i am wrong, you were a major general in afghanistan. you were a three-star in iraq in the multinational forces. you are one of the few going into a.o. where you have current -- you have commanded every level. is that correct? >> that is correct. >> one of the issues w
codepink protesters are arrested. we will speak with the group's founder who after returning from pakistan to protest drones, personally went to the house of john brennan, not on the door. he invited her in. we will find out what they talked about. you also speak with jeremy scahill, author of the forthcoming book and movied andirty wars," and melvin goodman, author of, "national insecurity: the cost of american militarism." all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. john brennan, president of and is picked to head the cia, defended the administration's controversial counterterrorism policies during his senate confirmation hearing thursday. he attempted to justify the administration's use of drone strikes, and backtracked on his earlier assertion that water boarding yielded useful information. he also denied he played a central role in the agency's torture of suspected terrorists, and suggested he was misled as a cia senior official over the value of information obtained through so-called enhanced interrogation tac
, pakistan. they'd been watching the compound with satellites. the house seemed too big for the neighborhood. there was no telephone connection. the people there burned their trash. there was a wall 12 feet high, and a walled-in balcony. who lived up there? >> owen: they briefed us on the individual they were calling "the pacer." >> pelley: "the pacer?" >> owen: the pacer. so, he'd come out of the house and walk around the yard, what was assessed as just kind of getting exercise. >> pelley: where did the pacer pace? >> owen: over here. >> pelley: in this courtyard back here? >> owen: right. so, he'd just kind of walk out in here. and a lot of the... the vegetation out here was probably purposely planted so surveillance couldn't... couldn't see down on them. >> pelley: and he'd just go 'round and 'round and 'round. >> owen: yup. he'd walk around the yard. sometimes, he'd walk with what they assessed to be a female, but, yeah, the... they just walked around the yard. they never stopped to help anybody do any work. if there was other people in the yard working, he never seemed to do any of that
, and among his priorities would be removing troops from afghanistan and improving us relations with pakistan. french president francois hollande has arrived in molly weeks after the troops entered. the interim president of mali is accompanied him after thanking the french forces, he was set to visit a mosque that houses manuscripts that were salvaged after a rebel attack. they will then head to the capital for talks. riot police have been deployed outside of the presidential palace in cairo after a night of clashes between security forces and writers who are calling for the -- protesters who are calling for the ousting of mohamed morsi. there were deadly protests last weekend. >> as morning broke over cairo, the streets were quiet. opposition activists camped out on career square and -- terrier square, and there were moments of calm, but evidence of the violence came to life. hours earlier mohamed morsi, fig erupted. police responders with tear gas and water cannons. at least one protester was shot dead. the latest protests began after friday prayers. >> the current situation is that residen
, but is not solely directed at cambodia's youth. and it has been more than two weeks since the government of pakistan -- >> it has been more than two weeks since the government of pakistan imposed direct rule on baluchistan pro vince. quetta -- our correspondent has to see if it has made any difference. >> it is a paramilitary force, responsible for securing the city from the many threats it faces -- sectarian violence, the pakistani taliban. it is a tough job. checkpoints have been targeted. bomb blasts are common. understanding the threat is crucial if pakistan is to secure the province. >> it is simple if it has been -- it would be simple if it would be tackled properly. unfortunately, we have seen in recent years, in the past decade -- we have not seen much instance of involvement of federal government to reveal -- to resolve these issues. >> in january, the government -- government-reuule was announced. they are hoping to better control security. for the market traders, it has made a difference. >> i warned them -- i want them to stay. we need to security that only the army and central governmen
in india and parts of pakistan during a violent response to a pregnant execution. -- execution. from the capital of new delhi. >> anger as news of his execution reached kashmir. >> they have conspired and killed an innocent. >> in anticipation, the government had blocked mobile phone signals, the internet, and cable channels to try to prevent people from communicating. they sent out extra paramilitary forces and police, warning people to stay at home. they ignored the chief minister's appeal for,. >> -- calm. >> there are people who can use his hanging for political gains. i hope the people control their emotions. >> he was convicted of conspiring with and sheltering the gunman who launched an assault on the indian parliament in 2001. five armed men stormed the heart of india's political establishment, killing eight police officers and the guard there -- gardiner. the supreme court ordered him to be hanged in 2004. his wife appeal for mercy. on saturday, the ministry confirmed that he had been hanged in the jail. >> eventually, it, needed in government making a decision -- it culmina
, the protests could turn violent. if they do, that's a real issue for pakistan. sectarian divisions in this country are at an all-time high. >> monday's protests just the latest response to a wave of sectarian attacks in pakistan. a city has seen the worst of the violence and we have more. >> this is perhaps the most painful part of this community's protests. they are refusing to bury their loved ones who were killed in saturday's bombing until the army is called in to go after the groups responsible. now leaders of the community also have two other demands. they want to put an end to the killings of their community and they have also insisted that laws be passed to make it a crime to discriminate against shias in pakistan. this is perhaps another sign of the anguish and suffering that this community has faced over the past few years. more than 80 people were killed in saturday's attack, an attack which followed a similar attack just last month in which more than 90 people were killed. in all since the start of this year, more than 200 shias have been killed and these people here ar
laughter is a day wasted. on a daily basis, them pakistan face news of political instability and terrorist attacks but one man is devoting him stove bringing laughter back into their lives. nhk world's correspondent has more. >> reporter: this tv commercial is widely popular in pakistan. it features this perform er. you would think it is mr. bean, but it would be wrong, but it is the pakistani take on the british icon. the mr. bean character was created by comedian rowen atkinson. although he got his start on british television, mr. bean won enormous worldwide popularity in the 1990s. it takes mr. bean from the original program and translates it into pakistan. >> translator: my kids love him. they are always watching. >> translator: we are bombarded every day with bad news. he helps us relax a bit. >> reporter: he is played by 35-year-old mohammed asef. when he was very young, his father died and he was forced to quit school. after leaving junior high, he found work in his hometown. but this one video clip turned around his life. one of asef's friends posted the footage online three years
are the safe havens for afghan insurgents across the pakistan border. the government of pakistan has failed to disrupt or eliinate. in addition the major shortcomings of the government of afghanistan in delivering governance, fighting corruption creates political and economic instability that could exacerbate the challenges in the 2014 transition. in addition to afghanistan sense, as can -- contend with when the most difficult issues in our security debate, the threat posed by iran in pursuit of its nuclear program. as the centcom commander general austin will be at the tip of the spear with regard to preparing militarily for the detention of an armed conflict with iran. he shares the presence view that all options must be some remaining on the table. including its relentless pursuit of its stability fomenting the violence through proxies such as hamas and hezbollah and through its own covert activities in the region. already destabilizing events in syria, yemen gaza egypt and sudan are made worse by iraq spending and supply of terrorist organizations seekg to undermine governments to spark
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